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SPEECHES, INTERVIEWS, ARTICLES

30.10.2014

RUSSIA’S APPROACHES TO NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT (Ambassador Yakovenko, for Russia Today)

 

Elimination of the threat posed by the weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons, remains one of the key priorities of the international community. Russia works actively to that end taking concrete steps for limitation and reduction of its nuclear arsenals. Over the last 25 years, they have been reduced many times over. Under the New START Treaty, Russia and the US have set a goal of reaching new agreed limits of warheads, means of delivery and launchers by 2018. We think that this goal is achievable.
Another existing agreement between Russia and the US in the field of nuclear missiles is the Treaty on Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles (INF). Unfortunately, our American partners have been committing violations of the Treaty. These include the use of target missiles during tests of missile defense system, as well as strikes by unmanned aerial vehicles. The scheduled deployment of Mk-41 launchers in Europe would also become a serious violation of the INF Treaty. We hope that as a result of the dialogue that has started on these issues the US will return to compliance with the commitments under this important agreement.
It is obvious that for further advancement towards a nuclear-free world it is necessary to establish appropriate international conditions. The most essential is ensuring equal security and maintaining strategic stability. As President Putin put it recently at the final plenary meeting of the Valdai Club, Russia is “ready for the most serious, concrete discussions on nuclear disarmament – but only serious ones without any double standards”.
We have repeatedly drawn attention to the factors that negatively impact strategic stability. One of the extremely destructive factors is the unilateral development by the US of the global missile defense system, which could be a serious impediment on the way to further nuclear disarmament and even create dangerous prerequisites that could lead to the resumption of a nuclear arms race.
We also have growing concerns over the US concept of Prompt Global Strike. It poses risks especially when undertaken within the context of the policy aimed at establishing overwhelming military supremacy. It, too, will negatively influence the prospects for nuclear disarmament. As President Putin said, “the use of a so-called first global pre-emptive strike may become tempting”.
Moreover, the threat of the placement of weapons in outer space also has negative influence on strategic stability. Over several decades no practical solutions have been agreed in that regard at the UN General Assembly. Under the circumstances we believe that it is time to take measures to prevent turning outer space into an arena of military confrontation. 10 years ago Russia launched the initiative to undertake political commitments not to be the first to place weapons in outer space. 10 UN member-states have joined this initiative. We call on everyone who shares the goal of keeping the outer space free of weapons to join the co-sponsors of a draft resolution that we traditionally present at the UNGA together with our partners.
We believe that it is important to move towards a legally binding prohibition of the placement of weapons in outer space. The updated draft of an international treaty on this issue was presented jointly by Russia and China at the Conference on Disarmament in June this year. We are looking forward to its thorough and constructive examination by the international community.




LATEST EVENTS

21.04.2018 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's talking points at the Press Conference, 20 April 2018

Since we met last time a lot of events took place: - Military strikes of the United States, UK and France against Syria in violation of the international law - Mission by OPCW inspectors to Douma - Speech of Prime Minister May in Parliament in support of the British aggression against Syria - Special meeting of the OPCW Executive Council (18 April 2018) - New developments in the classified case of Salisbury poisoning of Skripal family - No meaningful developments on the Glushkov case - and Cyber security threats I plan to comment all these issues. And I will be happy to answer all our questions, if you have any.


17.03.2018 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's interview for "Mail on Sunday" (full text)

Q: Bearing in mind that the US, France and Germany have said they agree with Britain that all the evidence suggests the attacks in Salisbury were the responsibility of the Russian state, what credibility can be placed on the denials issued by the Russian Government? A:We don't know if UK presented any evidence to US, France and Germany - highly likely none - but if they did, why not present it through the channels outlined in the Chemical Weapons Convention? Universal legal principle is presumption of innocence, and the burden of proof lies with the British Government. Its record includes the Iraq WMD dossier - you will remember that at some point doubting US and UK claims was considered a wild conspiracy theory. It is not any more.


26.01.2018 - Main foreign policy outcomes of 2017

In 2017, Russian diplomacy addressed multidimensional tasks to ensure national security and create a favourable external environment for our country's progressive development. Russia maintained an independent foreign policy, promoted a unifying agenda, and proposed constructive solutions to international problems and conflicts. It developed mutually beneficial relations with all interested states, and played an active role in the work of the UN, multilateral organisations and forums, including the G20, BRICS, the SCO, the OSCE, and the CSTO. Among other things, Russian policy has sought to prevent the destabilisation of international relations, and this responsible policy has met with broad understanding in the international community.


17.01.2018 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the unveiling of memorial plaque in Sayes Court Park

Dear Mayor, Dear Councillors, Lady Joan, Ladies and gentlemen, It is now 320 years ago that a truly remarkable man set foot in Deptford. As you know, the Russian Tsar Peter, later named the Great, visited Western Europe in 1697—1698 under the nickname of Peter Mikhailov, with his Grand Embassy. He was eager to find out about the latest achievements in science and technology and create new diplomatic alliances. Of course, England couldn’t escape his attention. He mostly studied shipbuilding at the famous Deptford Dockyard, but he also met King William III, and, reportedly, Isaac Newton. Peter’s landlord, the famous John Evelyn, was also a respected scientist – a founder member of the Royal Society.


13.12.2017 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the Presentation of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia by Russia 2018 Local Organising Committee.

Ladies and gentlemen, dear friends, I am pleased to welcome you to the Russian Embassy at the Presentation of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia by Russia 2018 Local Organising Committee. It’s a common knowledge, that football is the most popular game in the world. It is an honour for us to host the 2018 FIFA World Cup for the first time in the history of our country. I believe that those who come to Russia to support their national teams will leave with unforgettable memories.


08.12.2017 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the Roscosmos "Sputnik" exhibition launch at Rossotrudnichestvo

Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the Roscosmos "Sputnik" exhibition launch at Rossotrudnichestvo (7 December 2017)


25.11.2017 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the reception at the Embassy dedicated to Russian Film Week (24 November 2017)

Ladies and gentlemen, Dear friends First of all, I would like to pay tribute to the outstanding Russian opera singer Dmitri Hvorostovsky who passed away this week. In 2015 he gave a concert in this very hall. I am delighted to welcome you at our reception dedicated to the Russian Film Week and the environmental causes it champions. This year their charity partner is World Wide Fund for Nature, which runs many projects in Russia in coordination and with support of the Russian Government. Russia has a unique, fascinating wildlife. A number of this week’s films show the natural beauty of our land and are sure to raise awareness of how fragile this beauty is. We appreciate the WWF effort in Russia and worldwide and call on everybody to become a supporter, especially this year, marked as Year of Ecology in Russia.


20.11.2017 - Ambassador Alexander Yakovenko's remarks at the launch of the Russian Film Week (19 November 2017)

Ladies and gentlemen, It is a pleasure for me to be at the opening of the second edition of the Russian Film Week here in London – which this year also spans to Cambridge and Edinburgh.


16.10.2017 - Unpublished letter to the Editor of The Times (sent 12 October)

Sir, If British MPs are free to speak out, wherever they wish, on any issue, why try to block their freedom of speech (“Helping Putin”, 11 October)? If a TV channel wants (and is legally bound) to present different points of view, why slam those who express these views? If the mere act of giving an interview to foreign media amounts to high treason, why does The Times interview Russian politicians without fear? And finally - while MPs critical of Russia are welcome guests on the Russian TV channel RT, does your paper give the same treatment to those critical of the paper’s owner? Konstantin Shlykov Press Secretary of the Embassy of the Russian Federation


25.09.2017 - PRESENTATION by Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk at the Christian Future of Europe Conference 22 September 2017, London

Your Eminences and Your Excellencies, dear Mr. Ambassador, conference organizers and participants, I cordially greet all of those gathered today at the Russian Embassy in London to partake in this conference dedicated to the question of the future of Christianity in Europe. This topic is not only not losing any of its relevance, but is resounding ever anew. Experts believe that today Christianity remains not only the most persecuted religious community on the planet, but is also encountering fresh challenges which touch upon the moral foundations of peoples' lives, their faith and their values. Recent decades have seen a transformation in the religious and ethnic landscape of Europe.



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