19 June 2018
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PRESS RELEASES AND NEWS

16.03.2017

Why Are Fugitives From Justice Welcome in the UK?

Our western partners and the media regularly raise such issues as human rights, crime and corruption in Russia. As we stated previously, we view such dubious tactics as being agenda-driven. In fact, Russia is a committed party to the fundamental international conventions on human rights. Russia is a persistent anti-corruption campaigner and participates in the relevant anti-corruption initiatives.

Curiously enough, corrupt people find their way out of Russia and they are specifically setting their sights on London as they flee from justice. This raises many questions of human rights and corruption in Great Britain.

In fact, Great Britain de facto harbours quite a few Russian citizens who face charges in Russia for committing criminal offences such as fraud on a large scale, embezzlement, misappropriation of large amounts of money, robbery, murder.

Damages from these crimes incurred by the Russian state and private companies are running into tens and hundreds of millions, not to mention damage to the wellbeing of other Russian citizens, assault on their health and life.

Over the period of 2002-2016 Britain has refused to extradite 51 Russian citizens by direct and personal decisions of Home Secretary or as a result of chicanery tactics in London court. Dozens of cases are still pending.

Britain doesn’t provide any compelling reasons for such refusals. All we hear is that those hiding in here either have acquired immigrant status de jure, or that their extradition may result in human rights violations in Russia. It appears that those who are in Russia are corrupt individuals, but once on British soil, they are protected under farfetched pretexts, including assumed violation of their rights in future. This is absurd.

With most Russian extradition requests accompanied by detailed information on the criminal charges against such individuals, comprehensive legal and inculpatory basis, we repeatedly have to point out the obvious, i.e. the requests are not politically motivated and they have nothing to do with race, religion or ethnic background. Discrimination on these grounds is simply forbidden under Russian law. However, London prefers to keep ignoring real expert opinions, even by British experts, as well as written guarantees by the Russian side that all the rights of these Russian citizens will be respected, including those envisaged by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of 1950, the relevant conventions of the UN, the Council of Europe, and their protocols.

It never fails to amaze us that the Russian citizens who fled to the UK as fugitives, while here become British subjects. Once with a legal status, such individuals can also legalize funds acquired by criminal methods – quite a handy instrument for them for laundering money and obstructing justice. Just wonder why British authorities are willing to take them under patronage?

One cannot help coming to the conclusion that refusals of extradition by the British Government are politically motivated.

By all accounts, this practice discredits the country’s judiciary, which the British are proud of. We believe that police, investigative and prosecution authorities in any country, including the UK, should adhere to the same professional and moral principles of fighting crime and protecting people. Harboring Russian fugitives does not do the British Government credit in the eyes of the Russians public opinion and the international community.

More than that, actions of this kind send a signal to people committing economic and other criminal offences in the Russian Federation and around the world, that they can flee to Britain and be all right there as long as London and Moscow are at odds politically.

Beware of whom one may be dealing with in everyday life in Great Britain.
Here is a list of some extradition refusals.

 

List of Requests for Extradition of Russian Nationals
by the Prosecutor General’s Office of the Russian Federation
Refused by the British Authorities


The total number of Russian nationals the British authorities have refused to extradite to the Russian Federation over the period from 2002 to 2016 is 51 persons. Among those wanted and accused of committing various criminal offences in Russia are the following.

 

1. GLUSHKOV Nikolay Alekseevich (last, first and middle name), charged with organizing a large-scale fraud scheme with accomplices. Mr Glushkov is accused of embezzling large amounts of funds, linked to property theft of OJSC «Aeroflot - Russian Airlines».
Extradition request for Mr Glushkov was sent to the Home Office in January 2015 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 159 - 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation for committing a number of severe financial offences on the territory of Russia.
In February 2016 the Home Secretary declined to extradite the Russian national.


2. SHEMYAKIN Boris Yurievich, charged with assistance in large-scale embezzlement in collusion through abuse of power, linked to property theft of OJSC “Bank Moskvy” (Moscow Bank). Extradition request for Mr Shemyakin was sent to the Home Office in July 2015 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 160 – 4, Article 33 - 5 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
The Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


3. BORODIN Andrey Fridrihovich, charged with assistance in large-scale embezzlement scheme through abuse of power, with the help of accomplices, linked to the property theft of OJSC “Bank Moskvy” (Moscow Bank).
Extradition request for Mr Borodin was sent to the Home Office in October 2014 in order to bring him to criminal liability under with Article 160 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In March 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


4. AKULININ Dmitry Victorovich, charged with assistance in large-scale embezzlement scheme through abuse of power, with the help of accomplices, linked to the property theft of OJSC “Bank Moskvy” (Moscow Bank).
Extradition request for Mr Akulinin was sent to the Home Office in October 2014 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 160 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In March 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


5. NIKITIN Yuri Vladimirovich, charged with organizing and heading a criminal group, 4 counts of abuse of power with serious consequences, 4 counts of embezzlement through abuse of power by an organized group in large amounts, 2 counts of money laundering of funds acquired through committing crime by an organized group in large amounts (Articles 210 -1, Artcle 210 - 2, Article 160 – 4, 174.1 – 3 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation respectively).
Extradition request for Mr Nikitin was sent to the Home Office in August 2013 in order to bring him to criminal liability in compliance with the Russian legislation.
In August 2015 the Home Office officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


6. SKARGA Dmitry Yuryevich, charged with being part of a criminal group, abuse of power leading to serious consequences, embezzlement through abuse of power by an organized group, money laundering of funds acquired through committing crime by an organized group in large amounts (Articles 210 – 3, 201 – 2, 160 – 4, 174.1 – 3 of the under the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation respectively).
Extradition request for Mr Skarga sent to the Home Office in August 2013.
In August 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


7. IZMAYLOV Tagir Kadirovich, charged with being part of a criminal group, abuse of power resulting in serious consequences, embezzlement through abuse of power by an organized group in large amounts (Articles 210 – 3, 201 – 2, 160 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation respectively).
Extradition request for Mr Izmaylov sent to the Home Office in August 2013.
In August 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


8. ZHELYABOVSKIY Yuri Anatolyevich, charged with fraud.
Request was sent to the Home Office in May 2015 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 159 - 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In June 2016 the Home Secretary Office officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


9. CHERVYAKOV Ruslan Anatolyevich, charged with abuse of power for the purpose of deriving advantages and privileges for oneself, conflicting with the legal interests of the organization he was working for, which resulted in damage to its interests.
Extradition request for Mr Chervyakov was sent to the Home Office in November 2013 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 201 – 2 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In October 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


10. MUROMTSEVA Tatiana Anatolievna, has been charged with having committed several serious crimes on the territory of Russia, including fraud. Request was sent to the Home Office in May 2015 in order to bring her to criminal liability under Article 159 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In June 2016 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


11. GAVRIKOV Dmitry Gennadyevich, charged with large-scale fraud in collusion through abuse of power by an organized group under Article 159 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
Extradition request for Mr Gavrikov was sent to the Home Office in December 2013.
In October 2015 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


12. KAPCHUK Sergey Aleksandrovich, charged with large-scale fraud in collusion through abuse of power under Article 159 – 3of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
Extradition request for Mr Kapchuk was sent to the Home Office in August 2010.
In June 2014 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


13. ALEXANDROVICH Alexander Eduardovich, charged with organizing large-scale embezzlement through abuse of power, as well as money laundering.
Extradition request for Mr Alexandrovich was sent to the Home Office in August 2006 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 33 – 3, Article 159 – 4 (fraud by an organized group in large amount), Article 174.1 – 4 (organized money laundering, acquisition of property through criminal actions by an organized group) and Article 201 – 2 (abuse of power) of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In February 2007 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


14. BEYLIN Yury Arkadyevich, accused of illegal entrepreneurship, committed by an organized group, accompanied by the deriving large amount of revenue.
Extradition request for Mr Beylin was sent to the Home Office in February 2009 in order to bring him to criminal liability under point a) and b) of Article 171 – 2 (illegal entrepreneurship of an organized group) of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In March 2009 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


15. DIDYCHUK Lada Grigoryevna, charged with 8 acts fraud and large-scale embezzlement (Article 159 - 3 and 159 - 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation respectively).
Extradition request for Ms Didychuk was sent to the Home Office in December 2010 in order to bring her to criminal liability in compliance with the Russian legislation.
In August 2012 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


16. LOMAKO Oxana Veniaminovna, charged with large-scale fraud and embezzlement in an organized group.
Extradition request was sent to the Home Office in April 2011 in order to bring her to criminal liability under Article 159 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In April 2012 the Home Secretary officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


17. STROGANOV Dmitry Alexandrovich, charged with assistance in large-scale embezzlement through abuse of power with the help of accomplices. A criminal case was opened in connection with theft of property of OJSC “Bank Moskvy” (Moscow Bank)
Extradition request for Mr Stroganov was sent to the Home Office in February 2015 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 33 – 5 and Article 160 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In March 2016, Westminster Magistrate’s Court officially declined to extradite the Russian national.


18. DUBOV Yuli Anatolyevich, accused of large-scale fraud by organized group under Article 147 – 3 of the Criminal Code of the RSFSR. Extradition request for Mr Dubov was sent to the Home Office in November 2002. In October 2003 Bow Street Magistrates’ Court refused to extradite the Russian national.

 

19. ERESHCHENKO Anatoly Vladimirovich, charged with large-scale fraud in an organized group and property damage through deception and abuse of trust, committed by an organized group in large amounts. A request was sent to the Home Office in November 2013 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 159 – 4 (fraud and embezzlement) and point a) and b) of Article 165 - 2 (property damage through deception by an organized group) of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (charged with five crimes total).
In May 2015, A.V.Ereshchenko was arrested in compliance with the warrant issued by a District Judge at Westminster Magistrates’ Court. During the court hearing on the same day, he was released on bail until June 2015.
In December 2015, a District Judge at Westminster Magistrate’s Court discharged the Russian national from extradition proceedings.


20. MUZIKYAVICHUS Kyastutis, charged with attempt of illegal trade of large quantities of narcotics and psychotropic drugs in collusion, as well as drug smuggling and illegal acquisition, storage and transit of narcotic substances for the purpose of sale.
Extradition request for Mr Muzikyavichus was sent to the Home Office in June 2010 in order to bring him to criminal liability under
Article 30 – 3 and Article 228 – 4 (attempt of illegal trade of narcotics and psychotropic substances), Article 188 – 2 (drug smuggling) and Article 228 - 4 (illegal acquisition, storage and transit of narcotic substances for the purpose of sale) of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In December 2010, the Westminster Magistrates’ Court granted the request to extradite Mr Muzikyavichus. In February 2011, the Home Secretary has issued a certificate on this case. In May 2011, HM High Court of Justice in England has accepted the appeal and returned the case for reconsideration. In October 2011, the Westminster Magistrates’ Court officially declined to extradite Mr Muzikyavichus.


21. GORNOVSKY Nikolay Nikolayevich, charged with abuse of power. A request was sent to the Home Office in June 2007 in order to bring him to criminal liability under Article 201 – 1 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.
In February 2009, the proceedings were dropped by the court, the extradition request was returned. In August 2011 after another request the Magistrates’ Court refused to issue an arrest warrant.


22. TREFILOV Georgiy Yuryevich, charged with 16 counts of large-scale fraud by an organized group under Article 159 – 4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation. An Extradition request was sent in September 2011.
The Westminster Magistrates’ Court refused the request in November 2012.




LATEST EVENTS

18.06.2018 - Comment of the Embassy Representative on the British Authorities Response to the Complaints of the Russian Nationals about Unjustified Actions Towards Them upon Arrival in the UK

Question: Has there been a response from the British authorities with regard to the information sent to the Embassy by Russian citizens experiencing biased approach from the UK Border Force officials upon arrival in the UK? Answer: In response to the Embassy’s requests to the British Side to put an end to the practice of excessive and inappropriate security measures against Russian citizens (including minors) at the border in the points of entry to the UK, the UK Home Office has issued a formal reply. A letter printed on the Home Office form addressed to the Embassy consists of three sentences, does not contain any signature and is in essence a runaround reply reduced to “routine checks”. This demonstrates the lack of responsibility and ignorance towards serious concerns of the Russian Side and ordinary citizens travelling to the UK.


18.06.2018 - Comment of the Embassy Representative on the Consideration of the Russian Requests for Legal Assistance in the Cases of Nikolay Glushkov and Yulia Skripal by the British Side

Question: Are there any changes in the UK position on cooperation with the Russian Federation on the investigation of the murder of Nikolay Glushkov and the attempt on the lives of the Skripals? What is the current status of the requests by the Prosecutor General’s Office of Russia received by the UK Home Office? Answer: The British Side continues to keep deafening silence and has not provided answers neither to the Prosecutor General’s Office, nor the Embassy on the status of the official requests for legal assistance on the criminal cases initiated in Russia after the murder and the attempt of murder of Russian citizens on the British soil. Clearly, the UK is showing zero interest in cooperating on the investigation of these high-profile cases. These actions undermine law enforcement and other legal procedures aimed at establishing the truth and justice.


16.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the article by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson in the “Sun” newspaper, 15 June

Q: What is your reaction to the article by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson in the “Sun” newspaper, where he claims UK chose not to boycott World Cup in order not to be unfair towards players and sport fans, because they “have a dispute solely with the Government of Russia”? A: We took note of the abovementioned article. We agree that politics should not intervene in affairs of international sport. And Mr Foreign Secretary is right claiming that British fans in Russia have no reasons to feel threatened. Russian authorities, in cooperation with foreign partners, took every precaution to ensure maximum comfort and security for all World Cup guests. We are happy to have over 600 000 guests from practically every country in the world, including 10 000 British fans.


15.06.2018 - Press release on Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov’s meeting with British Ambassador to Russia Laurence Bristow, 15 June 2018

On June 15, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov met with British Ambassador to Russia Laurence Bristow at the latter’s request.


15.06.2018 - President Putin's speech at the 2018 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony at Luzhniki Stadium, 14 June 2018

Friends, I welcome all guests to the legendary Moscow stadium Luzhniki, everyone gathered in the numerous fan zones of the 2018 FIFA World Cup, and those watching us on television or online. I congratulate you – the entire large, multinational, tightly-knit international football family – on the start of the top tournament on the planet!


13.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning Russia’s response to the G7 statement on the Salisbury incident

Q: What is your reaction to the G7 Communiqué, where Russia is again accused of having poisoned Sergei and Yulia Skripal? A: Just as in the case of the G7 Foreign Ministers meeting in April, we have again witnessed unfounded allegations against Russia, not supported by any evidence. The British authorities continue to rely on allies’ “solidarity” while offering their partners nothing but assertions that there is “no other plausible explanation” of the incident except that Russia is responsible.


13.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the inquest into the death of Nikolay Glushkov

Q: Today marks three months since the death of Nikolay Glushkov. How would you comment on the course of the investigation by the British authorities of this case? A: We have to note that the British authorities are still refusing us cooperation on the investigation of the death on the British soil of ex-Deputy Director General of “Aeroflot” Nikolay Glushkov that occurred on 12 March.


08.06.2018 - Russia-Belarus border control rules for attendees of major sports competitions in Russia

On June 1, 2018 the Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation and the Government of Belarus on certain issues related to the entry of foreign citizens and stateless persons to international sports competitions came into force. The document in particular regulates the entry procedure for certain categories of foreign citizens into the territory of the Union State during the preparations and hosting of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. The Agreement provides for visa-free entry into the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus for the holders of spectator identity cards (fan passports or FAN IDs) or information about them provided they have an authentic ID. The said citizens can also cross the Russia-Belarus border if they travel via the following motor roads: M-1, P-23, A-240 and following railway routes Vitebsk-Pskov, Minsk-Smolensk, Gomel-Bryansk.


08.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the new legislation introduced to Parliament in the context of the Salisbury poisoning

Question: How would you comment on the new bill introduced by the British government to give police new powers to investigate all forms of “hostile state activity” and to stop, question, search and detain individuals at the UK border to determine whether they appear to be a person who is, or has been, engaged in hostile activity? Answer: We do not have the opportunity to review and assess the whole text of the bill. Meanwhile, it is unclear from publicly available information, how these new sweeping powers of British law enforcement, border and customs agencies will be applied in practice. In regard to whom and how will they be used? Who and how will examine the level of “hostility” of foreign States’ activities?


08.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the publication of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee’s report “The FCO’s preparations for the 2018 World Cup”

Q.: How would you comment on the contents of the report by the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee expressing concerns over safety and security of British fans at the 2018 World Cup in Russia? A.: Unfortunately, this report is another attempt to fuel anti-Russian sentiments on the eve of the World Cup despite the fact that the British police and the FCO have given positive assessments of their cooperation with Russia’s law enforcement authorities on safety and security issues at the World Cup.



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