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PRESS RELEASES AND NEWS

09.06.2017

UN Security Council Resolution 2354 (2017) - full text

Resolution 2354 (2017)
Adopted by the Security Council at its 7949th meeting, on 24 May 2017
The Security Council,
Recalling its resolutions 1373 (2001), 1624 (2005), 2178 (2014) and the Statement of its President (S/PRST/2016/6) of 11 May 2016,
Affirming its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,
Reaffirming its commitment to sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,
Stressing that terrorism in all forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security and that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable regardless of their motivations, whenever and by whomsoever committed,
Emphasizing that terrorism cannot and should not be associated with any religion, nationality or civilization,
Stressing that terrorism can only be defeated by a sustained and comprehensive approach involving the active participation and collaboration of all States and international and regional organizations to impede, impair, isolate, and incapacitate the terrorist threat,
Urging Member States and the United Nations system to take measures, pursuant to international law, to address all drivers of violent extremism conducive to terrorism, both internal and external, in a balanced manner as set out in the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy,
Recalling the measures aimed at countering violent extremism in order to prevent terrorism, as outlined in resolution 2178 (2014),
Stressing also that States must ensure that any measures taken to combat terrorism comply with all their obligations under international law, and should adopt such measures in accordance with international law, in particular international human rights law, refugee law, and humanitarian law,
Reaffirming that acts, methods, and practices of terrorism are contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations and that financing, planning and inciting terrorist acts and supporting terrorist o rganizations are also contrary to the
purposes and principles of the United Nations, Recalling the right to freedom of expression, reflected in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly in 1948 (“the Universal Declaration”), and recalling also the right to freedom of expression in Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights adopted by the General Assembly in 1966 (“ICCPR”) and that any restrictions thereon shall only be such as are provided by law and are necessary on the grounds set out in
paragraph 3 of Article 19 of the ICCPR,
Condemning in the strongest terms the incitement of terrorist acts and repudiating attempts at the justification or glorification (apologie) of terrorist acts that may incite further terrorist acts,
Stressing the importance of the role of the media, civil and religious society, the business community and educational institutions in those efforts to enhance dialogue and broaden understanding, and in promoting tolerance and coexistence,
and in fostering an environment which is not conducive to incitement of terrorism, as well as in countering terrorist narratives,

Noting with concern that terrorist craft distorted narratives that are based on the misinterpretation and misrepresentation of religion to justify violence, which are utilized to recruit supporters and Foreign Terrorist Fighters (FTFs), mobilize
resources, and garner support from sympathizers, in particular by exploiting information and communications technologies, including through the Internet and social media,
Noting as well the urgent need to globally counter the activities of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as Da’esh), Al -Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities to incite and recruit to commit
terrorist acts and recalling, in this regard and as reflected in the Statement of its President S/PRST/2016/6, its request to the Counter Terrorism Commi ttee to present a proposal to the Security Council for a “comprehensive international framework”
to effectively counter, in compliance with international law, the ways that ISIL (Da’esh), Al Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities use their narratives to encourage, motivate, and recruit others to commit terrorist acts,
1. Welcomes its document entitled “Comprehensive International
Framework to Counter Terrorist Narratives” number S/2017/375 with recommended
guidelines and good practices to effectively counter the ways that ISIL (Da’esh),
Al Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities use their narratives to encourage, motivate, and recruit others to commit t errorist acts;
2. Stresses that Member States and all relevant United Nations entities should follow the subsequent guidelines while implementing the Comprehensive International Framework:
(a) United Nations action in the field of countering terrorist narratives should be based on the United Nations Charter, including the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States;
(b) Member States have the primary responsibility in countering terrorist acts and violent extremism conducive to terrorism;
(c) Relevant United Nations entities should ensure greater coordination and coherence with donors and recipients of counter -terrorism capacity-building, taking into account national perspectives, and with a view to streng thening national ownership;
(d) To be more effective, counter-narrative measures and programs should be tailored to the specific circumstances of different contexts on all levels;
(e) All measures taken by Member States to counter terrorism, including to counter terrorist narratives, must comply with their obligations under international law, including international human rights law, international refugee law, and international humanitarian law;
(f) Efforts to counter terrorist narratives can benefit through engagement with a wide range of actors, including youth, families, women, religious, cultural, and education leaders, and other concerned groups of civil society;
(g) States should consider supporting the efforts aimed at raising public awareness regarding counter terrorist narratives through education and media, including through dedicated educational programs to pre-empt youth acceptance of terrorist narratives;
(h) The importance of promoting enhanced dialogue and broadened understanding among societies;
(i) States should consider engaging, where appropriate, with religious authorities and community leaders, that have relevant expertise in crafting and delivering effective counter-narratives, in countering narratives used by terrorists and their supporters;
(j) Counter-narratives should aim not only to rebut terrorists’ messages, but also to amplify positive narratives, to provide credible alternatives and address issues of concern to vulnerable audiences who are subject to terrorist narratives;
(k) Counter-narratives should take into account the gender dimension, and narratives should be developed that address specific concerns and vulnerabilities of both men and women;
(l) Continued research into the drivers of terrorism and violent extremism is necessary in order to develop more focused counter-narrative programmes;
3. Directs the Counter Terrorism Committee, with the support of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED), and in consultation with the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF) and other key actors, to facilitate international cooperation to implement the Comprehensive International Framework;
4. Requests the Counter-Terrorism Committee (CTC), in this regard, to:
(a) Continue to identify and compile existing good practices in countering terrorist narratives, in coordination with the CTITF office, the CTITF Working Group on Communications, and where appropriate in consultation with other relevant non-United Nations entities;
(b) Continue to review legal measures taken by States to enhance implementation of Security Council resolutions 1373 (2001), 1624 (2005) and 2178 (2014), and propose ways to strengthen international cooperation;
(c) Work with UNESCO, UNDP and other relevant United Nations agencies, through CTITF working groups, to promote, appropriate education-based efforts to recognize and prevent radicalization to violence and recruitment to terrorist groups;
(d) Contribute to efforts of the United Nations and its departments and agencies to develop models for effectively countering terrorist narratives, both online and offline;
(e) Further develop initiatives to strengthen public-private partnerships in countering terrorist narratives;
(f) Conduct outreach to entities with expertise and experience in crafting counter-narratives, including religious actors, civil society organizations, private-sector entities and others, to better inform the Committee’s understanding of good practices;
(g) Work with outside partners, including members of the CTED Global Research Network, to identify possible ways to measure the impact and effectiveness of counter-narratives;
(h) Continue participating in meetings and workshops, at the global and regional levels, with the objective of highlighting and sharing relevant good practices more widely;
(i) Maintain an up-to-date list of national, regional and global counter narrative initiatives;
5. Directs the CTC, with the support of the CTED, to:
(a) Organize at least one open meeting annually to review developments globally in countering terrorist narratives;
(b) Recommend ways for Member States regarding capacity building to enhance their efforts in the field of counter terrorist narratives, including through assistance provided by CTITF member entities and other assistance providers;
(c) Use the existing CTED Research network and create an annual work plan to provide advice and to support the work of the CTC and CTED on various matters related to countering terrorist narratives;
6. Directs the CTC, with the support of the CTED, as appropriate, and within their respective mandates, to include in the country assessments Member States efforts to counter terrorist narratives;
7. Emphasizes the need for continued engagement between the CTC and CTED and all key actors in countering terrorist narratives;
8. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.




LATEST EVENTS

18.06.2018 - Comment of the Embassy Representative on the British Authorities Response to the Complaints of the Russian Nationals about Unjustified Actions Towards Them upon Arrival in the UK

Question: Has there been a response from the British authorities with regard to the information sent to the Embassy by Russian citizens experiencing biased approach from the UK Border Force officials upon arrival in the UK? Answer: In response to the Embassy’s requests to the British Side to put an end to the practice of excessive and inappropriate security measures against Russian citizens (including minors) at the border in the points of entry to the UK, the UK Home Office has issued a formal reply. A letter printed on the Home Office form addressed to the Embassy consists of three sentences, does not contain any signature and is in essence a runaround reply reduced to “routine checks”. This demonstrates the lack of responsibility and ignorance towards serious concerns of the Russian Side and ordinary citizens travelling to the UK.


18.06.2018 - Comment of the Embassy Representative on the Consideration of the Russian Requests for Legal Assistance in the Cases of Nikolay Glushkov and Yulia Skripal by the British Side

Question: Are there any changes in the UK position on cooperation with the Russian Federation on the investigation of the murder of Nikolay Glushkov and the attempt on the lives of the Skripals? What is the current status of the requests by the Prosecutor General’s Office of Russia received by the UK Home Office? Answer: The British Side continues to keep deafening silence and has not provided answers neither to the Prosecutor General’s Office, nor the Embassy on the status of the official requests for legal assistance on the criminal cases initiated in Russia after the murder and the attempt of murder of Russian citizens on the British soil. Clearly, the UK is showing zero interest in cooperating on the investigation of these high-profile cases. These actions undermine law enforcement and other legal procedures aimed at establishing the truth and justice.


16.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the article by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson in the “Sun” newspaper, 15 June

Q: What is your reaction to the article by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson in the “Sun” newspaper, where he claims UK chose not to boycott World Cup in order not to be unfair towards players and sport fans, because they “have a dispute solely with the Government of Russia”? A: We took note of the abovementioned article. We agree that politics should not intervene in affairs of international sport. And Mr Foreign Secretary is right claiming that British fans in Russia have no reasons to feel threatened. Russian authorities, in cooperation with foreign partners, took every precaution to ensure maximum comfort and security for all World Cup guests. We are happy to have over 600 000 guests from practically every country in the world, including 10 000 British fans.


15.06.2018 - Press release on Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov’s meeting with British Ambassador to Russia Laurence Bristow, 15 June 2018

On June 15, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov met with British Ambassador to Russia Laurence Bristow at the latter’s request.


15.06.2018 - President Putin's speech at the 2018 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony at Luzhniki Stadium, 14 June 2018

Friends, I welcome all guests to the legendary Moscow stadium Luzhniki, everyone gathered in the numerous fan zones of the 2018 FIFA World Cup, and those watching us on television or online. I congratulate you – the entire large, multinational, tightly-knit international football family – on the start of the top tournament on the planet!


13.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning Russia’s response to the G7 statement on the Salisbury incident

Q: What is your reaction to the G7 Communiqué, where Russia is again accused of having poisoned Sergei and Yulia Skripal? A: Just as in the case of the G7 Foreign Ministers meeting in April, we have again witnessed unfounded allegations against Russia, not supported by any evidence. The British authorities continue to rely on allies’ “solidarity” while offering their partners nothing but assertions that there is “no other plausible explanation” of the incident except that Russia is responsible.


13.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the inquest into the death of Nikolay Glushkov

Q: Today marks three months since the death of Nikolay Glushkov. How would you comment on the course of the investigation by the British authorities of this case? A: We have to note that the British authorities are still refusing us cooperation on the investigation of the death on the British soil of ex-Deputy Director General of “Aeroflot” Nikolay Glushkov that occurred on 12 March.


08.06.2018 - Russia-Belarus border control rules for attendees of major sports competitions in Russia

On June 1, 2018 the Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation and the Government of Belarus on certain issues related to the entry of foreign citizens and stateless persons to international sports competitions came into force. The document in particular regulates the entry procedure for certain categories of foreign citizens into the territory of the Union State during the preparations and hosting of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. The Agreement provides for visa-free entry into the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus for the holders of spectator identity cards (fan passports or FAN IDs) or information about them provided they have an authentic ID. The said citizens can also cross the Russia-Belarus border if they travel via the following motor roads: M-1, P-23, A-240 and following railway routes Vitebsk-Pskov, Minsk-Smolensk, Gomel-Bryansk.


08.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the new legislation introduced to Parliament in the context of the Salisbury poisoning

Question: How would you comment on the new bill introduced by the British government to give police new powers to investigate all forms of “hostile state activity” and to stop, question, search and detain individuals at the UK border to determine whether they appear to be a person who is, or has been, engaged in hostile activity? Answer: We do not have the opportunity to review and assess the whole text of the bill. Meanwhile, it is unclear from publicly available information, how these new sweeping powers of British law enforcement, border and customs agencies will be applied in practice. In regard to whom and how will they be used? Who and how will examine the level of “hostility” of foreign States’ activities?


08.06.2018 - Embassy Press Officer’s reply to a media question concerning the publication of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee’s report “The FCO’s preparations for the 2018 World Cup”

Q.: How would you comment on the contents of the report by the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee expressing concerns over safety and security of British fans at the 2018 World Cup in Russia? A.: Unfortunately, this report is another attempt to fuel anti-Russian sentiments on the eve of the World Cup despite the fact that the British police and the FCO have given positive assessments of their cooperation with Russia’s law enforcement authorities on safety and security issues at the World Cup.



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