29 June 2017
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PRESS RELEASES AND NEWS

09.06.2017

UN Security Council Resolution 2354 (2017) - full text

Resolution 2354 (2017)
Adopted by the Security Council at its 7949th meeting, on 24 May 2017
The Security Council,
Recalling its resolutions 1373 (2001), 1624 (2005), 2178 (2014) and the Statement of its President (S/PRST/2016/6) of 11 May 2016,
Affirming its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,
Reaffirming its commitment to sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,
Stressing that terrorism in all forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security and that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable regardless of their motivations, whenever and by whomsoever committed,
Emphasizing that terrorism cannot and should not be associated with any religion, nationality or civilization,
Stressing that terrorism can only be defeated by a sustained and comprehensive approach involving the active participation and collaboration of all States and international and regional organizations to impede, impair, isolate, and incapacitate the terrorist threat,
Urging Member States and the United Nations system to take measures, pursuant to international law, to address all drivers of violent extremism conducive to terrorism, both internal and external, in a balanced manner as set out in the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy,
Recalling the measures aimed at countering violent extremism in order to prevent terrorism, as outlined in resolution 2178 (2014),
Stressing also that States must ensure that any measures taken to combat terrorism comply with all their obligations under international law, and should adopt such measures in accordance with international law, in particular international human rights law, refugee law, and humanitarian law,
Reaffirming that acts, methods, and practices of terrorism are contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations and that financing, planning and inciting terrorist acts and supporting terrorist o rganizations are also contrary to the
purposes and principles of the United Nations, Recalling the right to freedom of expression, reflected in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly in 1948 (“the Universal Declaration”), and recalling also the right to freedom of expression in Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights adopted by the General Assembly in 1966 (“ICCPR”) and that any restrictions thereon shall only be such as are provided by law and are necessary on the grounds set out in
paragraph 3 of Article 19 of the ICCPR,
Condemning in the strongest terms the incitement of terrorist acts and repudiating attempts at the justification or glorification (apologie) of terrorist acts that may incite further terrorist acts,
Stressing the importance of the role of the media, civil and religious society, the business community and educational institutions in those efforts to enhance dialogue and broaden understanding, and in promoting tolerance and coexistence,
and in fostering an environment which is not conducive to incitement of terrorism, as well as in countering terrorist narratives,

Noting with concern that terrorist craft distorted narratives that are based on the misinterpretation and misrepresentation of religion to justify violence, which are utilized to recruit supporters and Foreign Terrorist Fighters (FTFs), mobilize
resources, and garner support from sympathizers, in particular by exploiting information and communications technologies, including through the Internet and social media,
Noting as well the urgent need to globally counter the activities of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as Da’esh), Al -Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities to incite and recruit to commit
terrorist acts and recalling, in this regard and as reflected in the Statement of its President S/PRST/2016/6, its request to the Counter Terrorism Commi ttee to present a proposal to the Security Council for a “comprehensive international framework”
to effectively counter, in compliance with international law, the ways that ISIL (Da’esh), Al Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities use their narratives to encourage, motivate, and recruit others to commit terrorist acts,
1. Welcomes its document entitled “Comprehensive International
Framework to Counter Terrorist Narratives” number S/2017/375 with recommended
guidelines and good practices to effectively counter the ways that ISIL (Da’esh),
Al Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities use their narratives to encourage, motivate, and recruit others to commit t errorist acts;
2. Stresses that Member States and all relevant United Nations entities should follow the subsequent guidelines while implementing the Comprehensive International Framework:
(a) United Nations action in the field of countering terrorist narratives should be based on the United Nations Charter, including the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States;
(b) Member States have the primary responsibility in countering terrorist acts and violent extremism conducive to terrorism;
(c) Relevant United Nations entities should ensure greater coordination and coherence with donors and recipients of counter -terrorism capacity-building, taking into account national perspectives, and with a view to streng thening national ownership;
(d) To be more effective, counter-narrative measures and programs should be tailored to the specific circumstances of different contexts on all levels;
(e) All measures taken by Member States to counter terrorism, including to counter terrorist narratives, must comply with their obligations under international law, including international human rights law, international refugee law, and international humanitarian law;
(f) Efforts to counter terrorist narratives can benefit through engagement with a wide range of actors, including youth, families, women, religious, cultural, and education leaders, and other concerned groups of civil society;
(g) States should consider supporting the efforts aimed at raising public awareness regarding counter terrorist narratives through education and media, including through dedicated educational programs to pre-empt youth acceptance of terrorist narratives;
(h) The importance of promoting enhanced dialogue and broadened understanding among societies;
(i) States should consider engaging, where appropriate, with religious authorities and community leaders, that have relevant expertise in crafting and delivering effective counter-narratives, in countering narratives used by terrorists and their supporters;
(j) Counter-narratives should aim not only to rebut terrorists’ messages, but also to amplify positive narratives, to provide credible alternatives and address issues of concern to vulnerable audiences who are subject to terrorist narratives;
(k) Counter-narratives should take into account the gender dimension, and narratives should be developed that address specific concerns and vulnerabilities of both men and women;
(l) Continued research into the drivers of terrorism and violent extremism is necessary in order to develop more focused counter-narrative programmes;
3. Directs the Counter Terrorism Committee, with the support of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED), and in consultation with the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF) and other key actors, to facilitate international cooperation to implement the Comprehensive International Framework;
4. Requests the Counter-Terrorism Committee (CTC), in this regard, to:
(a) Continue to identify and compile existing good practices in countering terrorist narratives, in coordination with the CTITF office, the CTITF Working Group on Communications, and where appropriate in consultation with other relevant non-United Nations entities;
(b) Continue to review legal measures taken by States to enhance implementation of Security Council resolutions 1373 (2001), 1624 (2005) and 2178 (2014), and propose ways to strengthen international cooperation;
(c) Work with UNESCO, UNDP and other relevant United Nations agencies, through CTITF working groups, to promote, appropriate education-based efforts to recognize and prevent radicalization to violence and recruitment to terrorist groups;
(d) Contribute to efforts of the United Nations and its departments and agencies to develop models for effectively countering terrorist narratives, both online and offline;
(e) Further develop initiatives to strengthen public-private partnerships in countering terrorist narratives;
(f) Conduct outreach to entities with expertise and experience in crafting counter-narratives, including religious actors, civil society organizations, private-sector entities and others, to better inform the Committee’s understanding of good practices;
(g) Work with outside partners, including members of the CTED Global Research Network, to identify possible ways to measure the impact and effectiveness of counter-narratives;
(h) Continue participating in meetings and workshops, at the global and regional levels, with the objective of highlighting and sharing relevant good practices more widely;
(i) Maintain an up-to-date list of national, regional and global counter narrative initiatives;
5. Directs the CTC, with the support of the CTED, to:
(a) Organize at least one open meeting annually to review developments globally in countering terrorist narratives;
(b) Recommend ways for Member States regarding capacity building to enhance their efforts in the field of counter terrorist narratives, including through assistance provided by CTITF member entities and other assistance providers;
(c) Use the existing CTED Research network and create an annual work plan to provide advice and to support the work of the CTC and CTED on various matters related to countering terrorist narratives;
6. Directs the CTC, with the support of the CTED, as appropriate, and within their respective mandates, to include in the country assessments Member States efforts to counter terrorist narratives;
7. Emphasizes the need for continued engagement between the CTC and CTED and all key actors in countering terrorist narratives;
8. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.




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